Your Hard Waste

Consultation has concluded

More choice, greater flexibility.

We know how much you love your hard waste service. Council is looking at ways to make it even better, giving you more choice and greater flexibility in how you use the service.

The current hard waste service is delivered annually, with residents invited to place bulky wastes on the kerbside verge for collection on a scheduled date. This service is for household waste that does not fit into wheelie bins, and is not hazardous.

Council’s current hard waste collection contract will conclude in early 2018. Before we enter into a new contract, we are reviewing the service to ensure that it continues to meet your needs and expectations.

We are considering a range of different hard waste collection models, detailed here. All three options can all be delivered within the constraints of the current hard waste budget.

Share your views

Your feedback is important to us. You can:

Keep your eyes peeled for the survey form being sent to all households inside the next issue of Kaleidoscope magazine being delivered to your door.

Consultation closed at 5pm on Friday 25 March.



More choice, greater flexibility.

We know how much you love your hard waste service. Council is looking at ways to make it even better, giving you more choice and greater flexibility in how you use the service.

The current hard waste service is delivered annually, with residents invited to place bulky wastes on the kerbside verge for collection on a scheduled date. This service is for household waste that does not fit into wheelie bins, and is not hazardous.

Council’s current hard waste collection contract will conclude in early 2018. Before we enter into a new contract, we are reviewing the service to ensure that it continues to meet your needs and expectations.

We are considering a range of different hard waste collection models, detailed here. All three options can all be delivered within the constraints of the current hard waste budget.

Share your views

Your feedback is important to us. You can:

Keep your eyes peeled for the survey form being sent to all households inside the next issue of Kaleidoscope magazine being delivered to your door.

Consultation closed at 5pm on Friday 25 March.



CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • We live in a cul-de-sac next door to West Beach Kindy. Each year, the local residents both from the cul-de-sac and down the street use the same piece of land in front of the Kindy as the communal dumping ground. Bad enough once a year, but if you grant residents 2 x free dumping services a year each, we could see this piece of land becoming a ritual dumping ground 10 or more times a year.... and then it becomes habitual with people dumping adhoc. Illegal dumping is already happening now and is fast becoming a health hazard and is very unsightly. The last illegal dumping tool over 1 week to be removed. How can you guarantee that this practice will not become more prevalent?

    BK asked over 3 years ago

    Hi there. Thanks for sending in your question. 

    I'm sorry to hear you've been having problems with illegal dumping in the area surrounding your local kindergarten. Illegal dumping is a problem our Council takes very seriously, and we are very keen to address it where it occurs.

    If you are having repeated issues with illegal dumping in your local area, I would encourage you to call Council directly and ask to speak with the Illegal Dumping Compliance Officer. It is possible we could do something to better monitor what is happening in your street, and specifically target the people responsible. I will also advise them of the issues you have identified in your message.

    It is generally accepted that an at-call hard waste service is likely to slightly reduce illegal dumping. This is because it is available to residents year-round, rather than people needing to wait a full year for their free hard waste service. Having said that, based on the experiences of other Councils that already have at-call services in place, this impact is marginal and illegal dumping is likely to remain a problem whichever option Council ultimately implements.

    On average, the at-call service generally leads to a lower total number of hard waste piles being presented for collection each year, but with significantly more waste in each pile than with our current service. So having the service available to residents up to twice a year does not lead to twice as many piles of hard rubbish for collection.

    The other major difference between these styles of hard waste service is the fact that each pile of waste has been booked in by a known person. This allows some follow-up by Council if the hard waste is placed out in locations that cause problems, such as you describe. This allows a greater degree of guidance/education by Council where problems arise.

    If option 3 is implemented, the use of dump vouchers would reduce the total number of waste piles requiring kerbside pick-up.

    I hope this helps to answer your question. If you'd like to talk about it in any more detail, please don't hesitate to give me a call on 8408 1294.

    Fiona Jenkins
    Coordinator Waste + Sustainability
    City of Charles Sturt 


  • Hi there, while this is not a hard waste question, I'm wondering whether there is scope to increase the regularity of the yellow recycle bin? Our bin is overflowing every week and we end up placing recyclables into our blue bin. This clearly isn't ideal. Many families in our area also report the same problem. As more people are adopting better recycling procedures, it seems the council may need to adopt more regular collection services for recyclables.

    AJay asked over 3 years ago

    Thanks for your question AJay. It’s great to hear you’re making such great use of your kerbside recycling service and recycling everything you can.

    It’s true that while the 240 litre recycling bin is large enough for the average household, there are some that could use more space for their recyclables. Currently, your options include either requesting an additional recycling bin from Council, or taking the time to more carefully ‘pack’ items into your existing recycling bin.

    Another way of Council providing extra recycling capacity in future may be to allow our householders to request a larger recycling bin. While your current bin has a capacity of 240 litres, there are some available on the market with a capacity of up to 360 litres. We don’t currently have these available unfortunately, but it is something we could consider for the future.

    This current consultation is focused on our hard waste service. We will shortly be looking into ways we can improve your 3 bin service into the future and will consider your feedback then. Thank you very much for sending it in.

    In the meantime, if you’d like to request an additional recycling bin, please give Council a call on 8408 1111. The additional recycling bin costs $38 and there is a pick up fee of $36.50 per year payable after that. 

    Fiona Jenkins
    Coordinator Waste + Sustainability
    City of Charles Sturt 

  • In response to requesting feedback on your hard waste service, I would like to request that you make everyone aware of the fact that all hard rubbish goes to landfill, and perhaps encourage them think twice before putting out certain items. Hard rubbish is an easy way to send reusable items to landfill, instead of looking for better options. It would be nice to see a brochure showing recycling options. Perhaps a list of recycling stations and even promoting donating to op shops or pay it forward groups.

    Robyn Palmer asked over 3 years ago

    Hi Robyn. Excellent comment! 

    In years gone by, all hard waste did go straight to landfill. These days, we recycle as much of it as we can.

    With the current service, there are essentially three tiers of recycling that take place. Firstly, some material is salvaged by the community before it can be collected by Council. Secondly, there is a separate flat-bed recycling truck that picks up used televisions and computers, delivering them directly for recycling. And thirdly, what remains of the hard waste is collected by Council’s contractors and taken to a waste depot where it is picked over and recyclable items extracted where possible. The remainder of the waste is then sent to landfill for disposal.

    Reuse is always better than recycling, however, and if items are suitable for reuse (either through a charity organisation or a pay it forward initiative), then that is the best place for people to send them.

    The hard waste service is designed primarily for those items that are not suitable for re-use, and not able to be accepted through these other means.

    Fiona Jenkins
    Coordinator Waste + Sustainability
    City of Charles Sturt